Song of the Day

Cedar Walton – “Martha’s Prize”

A member of Art Blakey’s sextet in the 1960s, Walton was a leading voice in the development of hard-bop piano, possessed of a style that welded meticulous technical execution to an exuberant sense of swing.

8 Shares

Ahmad Jamal – “But Not For Me”

‘At the Pershing: But Not For Me’ was a breakout album for Ahmad Jamal, introducing the world at large to a pianist with a refreshingly minimalist style and an exceptional feel for dynamics.

15 Shares

Abigail Rockwell – “So In Love”

“This album was born from beauty and friction,” said Rockwell. “It is my love letter to the East and West coasts: the craggy edges of the East, the vast expanses of the West, and all the dark alleyways in between.”

17 Shares

Betty Carter – “You’re Mine You”

Vocalist Betty Carter was among the most respected mentor-performers of her day, famous for bringing young, up-and-coming musicians on tour and honing their talent on the road.

14 Shares

Chano Pozo – “Manteca”

“Manteca,” by percussionist Chano Pozo and the Dizzy Gillespie Jazz Orchestra, served as a prototype for the genre of music that would come to be known as Latin jazz. 

33 Shares

Herbie Nichols – “The Lady Sings The Blues”

Pianist Herbie Nichols was born on this day (January 3) in New York City in 1919. An overlooked genius, Nichols was a virtuosic piano player whose original compositions revealed an immense talent for rhythmic ingenuity, harmonic adventurousness and indomitable swing.

12 Shares

Trombone Shorty – “Where Y’At”

“Where Y’At,” today’s Song of the Day, comes from Trombone Shorty’s 2010 album ‘Backatown,’ which reached the No. 1 position on the Billboard Contemporary Jazz for nine consecutive weeks. 

9 Shares

Charlie Parker – “White Christmas”

Merry Christmas, jazz fans. Our gift to you: this rare recording of Charlie Parker performing “White Christmas” during a live broadcast at the Royal Roost in New York City in 1948.

2 Shares

The Authoritative Voice in Jazz

FOLLOW US ON